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world reports. >> reporter: the l-0 uses a technology to race over long distances at superfast speeds. it's called superconducting magnetic levation. officials have just opened a new track for test runs in central japan. it's nearly 43 kilometers long. commercial service isn't scheduled to begin until 2027. once the train is up and running it will take people from tokyo to nagoya in just 40 minutes. one hour less than a bullet train trip. >> translator: i was impressed by the speed and its quietness surprised me. >> translator: the train will make it much easier to get around. i'm excited. >> translator: the l-0 will drastically change japan's economy and society. this technology will help propel japan ahead in the world. >> reporter: engineers first began working on the train nearly half a century ago. they've kept at it ever since. in 2003, a prototype reached 581 kilometers per hour, a record that still stands. special magnets hold the key to the train's speed. the l-0 has superconducting electromagnets along the outside. they make it possible for the train to levitate and raise al
'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. thanks for joining us.  - coming up, new technology and new moral challenges. - these are questions we need to think about before we have the technologies. so, we have to engage in what i call prophylactic ethics. we need to think about what this means for us. - nasa's paul root wolpe talks mind-reading, cerebral privacy, health in the space station, and more from the cutting edge of bioethics. it's just ahead on "global ethics forum." - today's guest has spent his career examining the ethics underlying tomorrow's scientific breakthroughs. as one of the nation's most prominent bioethicists, paul root wolpe encourages scientists to reconsider not only what they can do, but what they should do. dr. wolpe is the asa griggs candler professor of bioethics and the director of the center for ethics at emory university.
unveiled a newly developed technology that automatically stops a car from colliding with a bicycle. volvo's system applies the brakes when windshield cameras as well as radar and infrared ray bumper sensors find an object in front is getting dangerously close. the technology works even when a bicycle faulters in the path of a car. systems have trouble detecting fast-moving bicycles, but the company says its swifter imagery analysis by the windshield cameras helps prevent a collision. >> if we look into the data, the national data, we can see that cyclist is one of the top three fatalities in traffic. so that's why volvo now launched the cyclist detection functionality. >> the company plans to price the system at around $2,000. >>> people in china are crowding onto beaches to get some relief from the summer sun. they've been reminded for years to cover up, but these days some women are taking the advice to another level. nhk world's hiroshi hamaguchi explains. >> reporter: this beach is a popular resort spot. on sundays it attracts a couple of hundred thousands people including young group
a report. >> they use a technology developed in japan to race over long distances at super fast speeds. it's called computer lef station. they opened a track for test runs in central japan. it is 43 kilometers long. >> once the train is up and running, it will take people to tokyo in just 40 minutes. hour less than a bullet train trip. >> i was impressed by the speed and the quietness surprised me. >> the train will make it easier to get around. i'm excited. >> it will change japan's economy and -- >> in 2003, a prototype reached 581 kilometers per hour, a record that still stands. special magnets pull the key to the train's speed. the l 0 has magnets along the outside that make it possible for the train to levitate and raise along the track without losing altitude or speed. it is necessary to eliminate the resistance. the train is equipped with a cooling system. it reduces the temperature to minus 26 degrees celsius and results in 0 resistance. s ran' way technologies are among the fastest in the world. railroad executives and officials hope to take japan's expertise abroad by taking this
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4